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Richard Gilder Graduate School
American Museum of Natural History
79th Street at Central Park W
New York, NY 10024

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In Prep

  • Kelly A. Speer, Tiago Souto Martins Teixeira, Susan L. Perkins, Katharina Dittmar, Melissa R. Ingala, Claudia Wultsch, Konstantinos Krampis, Alexis Brown, Spencer Galen, Carl Dick, Nancy B. Simmons, and Elizabeth L. Clare. Habitat island area changes the composition and network structure of microbiome communities of blood-feeding arthropods. In prep for Molecular Ecology.
     

  • Eugenia Naro-Maciel, Irena Werner, Melissa Ingala, Michael Tessler, Seth Wollney, Allison Fitzgerald. Next-Generation Approaches for Biodiversity: Monitoring Oyster Restoration with Environmental DNA. Under review. Estuarine, Coastal and Shelf Science.

Published Articles

  • Jose Luis Poma Urey, Luis H. Acosta, and Melissa R. Ingala. Dos especies de Eptesicus Rafinesque, 1820 (Chiroptera, Vespertilionidae) registradas por primera vez en Bolivia. Ecología en Bolivia, Set 2019, vol.54, no.2, p.155-161. ISSN 1605-2528.

     

  • Melissa R. Ingala, Daniel J. Becker, Jacob Bak Holm, Karsten Kristiansen, and Nancy B. Simmons. Habitat fragmentation is associated with dietary shifts and microbiota variability in common vampire bats. In press. Ecology and Evolution. 2019;00:1–16. https://doi.org/10.1002/ece3.5228 

  • Melissa R. Ingala, Nancy Simmons, and Susan Perkins (2018). Bats are an Untapped System for Understanding Microbiome Evolution in Mammals. mSphere.3(5). https://doi.org/10.1128/mSphere.00397-18

  • Melissa R. Ingala, Nancy Simmons, Claudia Wultsch, Konstantinos Krampis, Kelly A. Speer, and Susan L. Perkins (2018). Comparing Microbiome Sampling Methods in a Wild Mammal: Fecal and Intestinal Samples Record Different Signals of Host Ecology, Evolution. Frontiers in Microbiology. doi: https://doi.org/10.3389/fmicb.2018.00803

  • Craig L. Frank, Katherine G. Sitler-Elbel, Anna J. Hudson, and Melissa R. Ingala (2018). The anti-fungal properties of epidermal fatty acid esters: insights from White-Nose Syndrome (WNS) in bats. Molecules. 23(8). doi:10.3390/molecules23081986

  • Melissa R. Ingala, R.E. Ravenelle, J.J. Monro, and C.L. Frank (2017). The Effects of Epidermal Fatty Acid Profiles, 1- oleoglycerol, and Triacylglycerols on the Susceptibility of Hibernating Bats to White Nose Syndrome (WNS). PLoS ONE. 12(10): e0187195. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0187195

  • Craig L. Frank, Melissa R. Ingala, Rebecca E. Ravenelle, Kelsey Dougherty-Howard, Samuel O. Wicks, Carl Herzog, Robert Rudd (2016). The Effects of Cutaneous Fatty Acids on the Growth of Pseudogymnoascus destructans, the Etiological Agent of White-nose Syndrome (WNS). PLoS ONE. doi: https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0153535